BCAL Construction Project

GlueX

 
 

The Barrel Calorimeter (BCAL) is a major detector system for the GlueX project at Jefferson Lab. 


The BCAL is an electro-magnetic sampling calorimeter based on scintillating fibres and will be deployed inside the GlueX detector's super-conducting solenoid.  The device is comprised of a lead and scintillating fibre matrix, consisting of 185 layers of  corrugated lead sheets, each of 0.5mm thickness, and 1-mm-diameter, multi-clad,  scintillating fibres, bonded in place of the lead grooves using BC-600 optical epoxy.  This geometry results in about 15350 fibres per module, or over three-quarters of a million for the entire device. The detector consists of 48 modules, each having a trapezoidal cross section (8.5-12.5cm taper), and will form a  390cm long cylindrical shell with inner and outer radii of 65cm and 90cm, respectively.  Each end will be read out using 40 large-area Silicon PhotoMultipliers, attached to wedge boards having on board amplifiers and energy summing circuits.


The BCAL was constructed entirely at the University of Regina and machined in town, at Ross Machine Shop.  After quality assurance testing, the modules were delivered four at a time to Jefferson Lab, over the 2010-2012 period. Test beam (12 GeV) at JLab is expected in 2014 and physics running in 2015.

Recent Project Status

  1. 1.JLab Upgrade approval (Sep. 2008)

  2. 2.Award of construction to U of Regina (Feb. 2009)

  3. 3.Prototype contract award (May 2009)

  4. 4.Full contract award (August 2009)

  5. 5.Construction commences (Nov. 2009)

  6. 6.BCAL completed ahead of schedule (Dec. 2012)

About the project

The what and where

About the physics

Besides the public information on the Hall D Project available at our sister site at Indiana University and at our Portal, the two articles below provide a very good source of the physics goals of Hall D, namely the investigation of the strong nuclear glue and the search for excited hybrid (gluonic) meson states.

• Article in the CERN Courier.

• Article in American Scientist.